Declarations

DECLARATION OF THE SHARPEVILLE MASSACRE SITES AS NATIONAL HERITAGE SITES

DeclarationType: 

GazetteNo: 

40526

Gazette Date: 

Friday, December 30, 2016

NoticeNo: 

1606

Notice Date: 

Friday, December 30, 2016

Gazette Notice Status: 

  • Current

GazetteFile: 

AttachmentSize
PDF icon 40526_30-12 - Sharpeville.pdf567.21 KB

DiagramNo: 

L.No. 171/ 1986

ShortDescription: 

By virtue of the powers vested in the South African Heritage Resources Agency, in terms of section 27 (5) of the National Heritage Resources Act (No. 25 of 1999) SAHRA hereby declares three of the Sharpeville Massacre Sites namely the Memorial Garden located on Erf 9172, the Police Station on Erf 9175 and the graves of the 69 people killed at the massacre located in the Phelindaba Cemetery, Theunis Kruger Street Vereeniging, as National Heritage Sites.

FullDescription: 

The 21st March 1960 marked a critical turning point in the history of South Africa when police opened fire on a peaceful march led by the Pan Africanist Congress in protest against the pass laws. Marches were organised in both Sharpeville (Gauteng) and Langa (Cape Town). This display of police brutality in which 69 people died, was to become known as the Sharpeville Massacre. Demonstrations and riots broke out across the country in reaction to the police response to both protests in Sharpeville and Langa. This led to the first declaration of a State of Emergency under Apartheid, and saw the banning of the ANC and Pan Africanist Congress (PAC). This brutal response from the State was the catalyst for the move away from passive resistance to armed struggle. The massacre inspired the painting of the “Black Priest” by Ronald Harrison (itself an important Struggle artwork that raised funds for Defence and Aid Movement). As testimony to the brutal force used to enforce the racial policies of the Apartheid administration, the Sharpeville Police Station, the Memorial Garden and the graves of the victims commemorate and honour those who bravely marched in protest against the forced relocation and restricted movements imposed by the Pass Laws and lost their lives on 21st March 1960

 
 

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